Anesco smashes 100 sites barrier

Portfolio includes 28 new solar farms completed ahead of RO deadline

The solar developer Anesco has seen its portfolio swell to more than 100 sites ahead of last week’s deadline for the Renewables Obligation.

The Reading-based firm said it now has a total of 101 solar farm sites, with a total capacity of 480MW, which is enough to power 137,000 homes.

The company’s portfolio includes 28 new solar farms, which were successfully powered-up ahead of last week’s closure to new generating capacity under the subsidy scheme.

“As the latest sites were completed ahead of the obligation deadline, we were able to secure the maximum yield for our customers and will now be maintaining them to ensure they continue to operate effectively for the lifetime of the projects,” said executive chairman, Steve Shine.

The chairman added energy storage continues to be a key focus of the company, as well.

“Energy storage has great potential to help stabilise the grid and make sure the maximum benefit is being reaped from solar and other renewable generation systems,” insisted Shine.

“It’s an exciting, fast-growth area and we’re delighted to be leading the field and making it a viable model for our customers.”

Another developer, g2 Energy said it completed work on 24 solar farms during the last three weeks of March to achieve accreditation prior to the obligation’s cut-off date.

“Unfortunately, we suspect that the number of solar PV and medium-scale wind developments will dramatically reduce in the forthcoming year, however we have now positioned ourselves to assist with the new emerging technologies of battery energy storage and gas engine generation plants,” said managing director, Kelvin Ruck.

Author: Jamie Hailstone,
Channel: Operations & Assets
Tags: UK , Wind , Solar

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