Welsh Government welcomes progress on renewable energy

A new report shows 43 per cent of the country’s electricity consumption last year came from renewables

More than 40 per cent of all electricity consumption in Wales last year came from renewables, according to the latest figures from the Welsh Government.

The Energy Generation in Wales 2016 report reveals 43 per cent of the country’s electricity consumption in 2016 came from renewable energy – up from 32 per cent the year before.

The report also shows there are more than 67,000 renewable projects in Wales last year, up 23 per cent since 2014.

It also reveals renewable energy capacity has increased by almost half (47 per cent) since 2014, making up 18 per cent of all electricity generation.

There are also now 62,420 projects of renewable energy projects in local ownership, generating a total of 575MW.

And solar is the most common renewable technology, accounting for 81 per cent of renewable projects.

In September, the Welsh energy cabinet secretary, Lesley Griffiths announced she wanted Wales to generate 70 per cent of its electricity consumption from renewable energy by 2030. 

“Today’s report shows we are already making very encouraging progress on renewable energy,” she said.

“2016 was quite a year for energy here. We generated enough renewable energy to provide 43 per cent of the electricity we used. Flintshire already hosts the biggest solar project in the UK and now we have Pen y Cymoedd, the largest wind project in England and Wales,” added Griffiths.

“By using our abundant natural resources in a sustainable way, we can ensure energy continues its important role in achieving our energy and decarbonisation targets. By doing so, we will deliver a prosperous and low carbon Wales.”

Author: Jamie Hailstone,
Channel: Policy & Regulation
Tags: Welsh Government , UK , Wind , Solar , Government and NGOs

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