Heat

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Greater flexibility could cut energy system costs by £16.7 billion per year by 2050, according to new research from the Carbon Trust and Imperial College London. The report said flexibility should be embedded into all sectors of the energy system – power, heat and transport – to reduce the impact and cost of their decarbonisation.
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An official for Cambridge City Council has raised concerns over a “headlong rush” towards air-source heat pumps, saying there are “lots of problems” with the technology, particularly within urban areas. Environmental quality and growth manager Jo Dicks made the comments during a discussion of retrofitting as part of Utility Week’s Future of Heat conference.
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Cadent Foundation director Julia Dwyer sets out a model for maximising the impact of innovation targeted at tackling fuel poverty. Partnership, flexibility and an ability to look beyond regulated needs codes are its key hallmarks.
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Water companies from across the UK as well as supply partners, NGOs and academic groups have been awarded funding for 11 projects from the Ofwat Innovation Fund to tackle shared problems faced by the sector. See the full list as well as the thoughts of Ofwat's John Russell.
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UK Power Networks (UKPN) has launched a new online portal that enables installers to get quicker and easier decisions on whether they can connect green technologies such as electric vehicle chargers, heat pumps, solar panels and batteries. The electricity distribution network said Smart Connect was developed in partnership with Octopus Electric Vehicles in response to feedback from customers, who said the old process was confusing and time-consuming.
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Ground source heat pumps could play much more than the “niche” role in the decarbonisation of heating that is often assumed by policymakers, Regen has argued in a new report. The not-for-profit consultancy said they have significant advantages over their air source equivalents, requiring less electricity both annually and during winter peaks, whilst offering the opportunities to store thermal energy in the ground and utilise sources of waste heat.
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Thames Water and Kingston Council are embarking on a project to capture heat from effluent at a wastewater treatment site and supply it to new housing estate via a district heating network. The network will eventually be expanded to serve public and commercial buildings in Kingston town centre.
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Two semi-detached homes containing appliances fuelled entirely by hydrogen, the first of their kind in the UK, are to be built in Low Thornley, Gateshead. The project is being run by Northern Gas Networks and Cadent, both of which have input £250,000 of funding. It will also be part-funded by the government’s £25 million Hy4Heat Innovation programme.
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